Reproducibility Article in “The Conversation”

I was asked to write 200-300 words on my views on whether there is a reproducibility crisis in the sciences for an article that was appearing in The Conversation. I was so passionate about what I was writing that I ended up writing over 1,200 words. The final article was, of course, edited down by … Continue reading Reproducibility Article in “The Conversation”

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Low Power & Effect Sizes

Yesterday I posted the following tweet which has since turned out to be my most popular tweet EVER with hundreds of retweets and "likes" in 24 hours: https://twitter.com/JimGrange/status/838436187144605696 My motivation for the tweet was quite straightforward. I have recently been emailing academics in my department every week with different topics in an attempt to raise … Continue reading Low Power & Effect Sizes

10 Recommendations from the Reproducibility Crisis in Psychological Science

This week I gave an internal seminar at my institution (Keele University, UK) entitled "Ten Recommendations from the Reproducibility Crisis in Psychological Science". The audience was to be faculty members and psychology graduate students. My aim was to collate some of the "best-practices" that have emerged over the past few years and provide direct advice … Continue reading 10 Recommendations from the Reproducibility Crisis in Psychological Science

My Voluntary Commitment to Research Transparency & Open Science

The past few weeks have been quite an exciting time for psychological science, with the much-anticipated publication of the Open Science Collaboration's reproducibility project results in the journal Science. As should be well-known to you by now, the findings were bleak. (For what I believe to be the best summary of this paper, see Ed Yong's … Continue reading My Voluntary Commitment to Research Transparency & Open Science

How many times is “Science” mentioned in each party’s manifesto?

The U.K. General Election is fast approaching, and each political party is clamouring for the public's attention. All main parties have now published their manifestos: the document outlining plans and policies the party will implement if in office. In them you will find promises of reducing unemployment, cutting the nation's deficit, and improving the National … Continue reading How many times is “Science” mentioned in each party’s manifesto?

Grant-Givers: Embrace (and Fund!) Research Without Impact

impact / n.  the benefit or contribution to society of research Researchers in the U.K.—and likely elsewhere—will be no strangers to the term "impact". Our research is supposed to have it. We are supposed to evidence it. Our institutions in their Research Excellence Framework—the "system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education … Continue reading Grant-Givers: Embrace (and Fund!) Research Without Impact

You can’t put an impact factor on that!

I'm very proud of my most recent paper (Schuch & Grange, in press), soon to be published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, & Cognition. The pride  comes not just from being accepted in a prestigious cognitive journal—but wow, I'm certainly thrilled by it—but from aspects of the research that have no metrics. Forget your impact … Continue reading You can’t put an impact factor on that!